Brexit Transport Update

Following the UK leaving the EU, further rules regarding moving horses, and other equines from the UK to the EU from 1st January 2021 has been released. Separate information has also been made available in relation to importing horses from the same date.

To move horses and other equines from the UK to the EU from 1 January 2021, you’ll need to contact:

· your official vet to book an appointment so you can get blood tests taken in time

· an agent or transporter and tell them when you plan to travel – you may need more time to plan travel through an EU border control post (BCP).

You’ll also need to:

· get equines tested for certain diseases

· meet isolation and residency requirements

· apply for an export health certificate (EHC)

· check you have the right equine identification (ID)

· check if you need an export welfare declaration

Tests for equines before export

You’ll need to get your equines tested to prove they’re free of certain diseases. You’ll need tests for:

· equine infectious anaemia – within 30 days before travel for permanent exports, or 90 days before travel for temporary exports of under 90 days (for horses registered with a national branch of an international body for sporting and competition purposes)

· equine viral arteritis – within 21 days of travel for uncastrated male equines older than 180 days, unless they meet vaccination requirements

Isolation and residency requirements before export

You’ll need to keep horses and other equines in certain conditions before export. Before you export temporarily (less than 90 days) a horse registered with a national branch of an international body for sporting or competition purposes, you will need to keep it on a holding in the UK or a country with a similar health status either:

· for 40 days

· since its entry to the UK, if the animal was imported directly from the EU or a country with a similar health status to the UK less than 40 days before you export

Before permanent export, or temporary export of any other equine, you’ll need to keep the animal separate from other equines that do not have equivalent health status for at least 30 days.

You’ll also need to keep the animal on a holding in the UK under veterinary supervision, or a country with similar health status either:

· for 90 days

· since birth if the animal is younger than 90 days old

· since its entry to the UK if the animal was imported directly from the EUless than 90 days before you export

Your supervising vet does not need to be an official vet. However, an official vet must confirm that you’ve met these requirements before you export the equine.

Apply for an export health certificate (EHC)

You need to complete an EHC and some supporting documents to export a live animal from 1 January 2021.The EHC will replace the Intra Trade Animal Health Certificate (ITAHC) for exports to countries in the EU.

To apply for an EHC you’ll need to:

1. Find the EHC and other forms you need on the export health certificate form finder.

2. Nominate an official vet to inspect your horse or other equines. There are various ways you can find one:

· check the list of professionals who can certify export health certificates

· ask at your local vet

· email csconehealthovteam@apha.gov.uk (if you’re in Northern Ireland contact DAERA)

3. Fill in the EHC and supporting forms

4. APHA will send your EHC to your official vet within 7 working days, or within one working day if you plan to export in the next 7 working days. They’ll provide copies in the languages of the destination country and the country where the horse or other equine first enters the EU.

5. Arrange for the official vet to check the horse or other equine meets the health requirements of the destination country within 48 hours of travel. The official vet will complete and sign the EHC and send a copy to APHA.

6. The official vet must give you the EHC on the same day that you load the animals for travel.

7. Keep the completed EHC and other documents with the animal during travel.

There’s no fee for the certificate, but you’ll need to pay for your vet’s services.

Check you have the right equine ID

You’ll be able to use the horse passport (industry-issued equine ID) to export equines registered with one of the following:

· an EU-recognised studbook or pedigree register

· a national branch of an international racing or competition organisation

To export all other equines, you’ll need to apply for a government-issued equine ID from:

· APHA if you’re in Great Britain

· DAERA if you’re in Northern Ireland

APHA will tell you when they have sent your equine ID form to your official vet. Your official vet will give you the equine ID with the EHC when they check the animal before travel. You’ll need to keep the equine ID together with the horse passport and the EHC with the animal during travel.

The equine ID will be valid for a single journey to the EU and return to the UK. You’ll need to apply for a government-issued equine ID every time you move an unregistered horse to the EU.

EU border rules

You’ll need to complete a customs declaration form before the equine arrives at the EU border.

Plan your trade route so that your animal can be inspected at an EU BCP. Some BCPs accept both registered and unregistered equines but not all do. You’ll need to check the correct BCP to go through.

Make sure you or your EU-based import agent has notified the BCP on TRACES, in advance, that your consignment is arriving – check with the BCPfor how much notice needs to be given.

Recognition of UK studbooks

The UK has applied to the EU for the recognition of UK studbooks. You should plan any exports on the basis that the UK’s studbooks will not be recognised immediately from 1 January 2021. This means if you’re exporting a horse registered in a UK studbook you should follow the rules set out for unregistered horses.

Export horses and ponies from 1 January 2021
Rules for exporting horses and other equines, including ponies and donkeys from 1 January 2021.

If recognition is granted, horses in recognised UK studbooks will be able to use export health certificates that are only available to registered horses.

This would mean these horses can follow the same rules for blood testing, residency and isolation as horses registered with a national branch of international body for racing or competition when moving to the EU for under 90 days.

In addition, these horses would:

· no longer need a government-issued equine ID to move from the UK to the EU

· be able to enter the EU via BCPs approved for registered equines

Other export requirements

Before exporting, businesses must:

· register for an Economic Operator Register and Identification (EORI) number

· be aware of potential EU trade tariff changes

· find out the commodity code for their goods

· choose the correct customs procedure code (CPC) for their goods

· consider applying for an ATA carnet to streamline customs processes

· check the wider HMRC guidance for exporters

· read the guidance from the Department of Agriculture Food and the Marine in the Republic of Ireland (ROI) if you regularly move horses or other equines between the UK and ROI

Find out more about exporting animals and animal products from 1 January 2021.

Moving horses to Switzerland, Liechtenstein, Norway or Iceland

From 1 January 2021, if you want to move horses from the UK to Switzerland, Liechtenstein, Norway or Iceland you should consult your transporter or the competent authority in the country you’re exporting to.

Re-entry to the EU

EU owners returning horses to the EU can use a streamlined re-entry process for registered horses that have been in the UK for less than 30 days for racing or competitions. Under EU rules, these horses will need a health certificate or veterinary health attestation from their own country proving when the animal left the EU.

In this streamlined re-entry process, animals still need an EHC and equine ID but do not need to have blood tests or meet the same residency and isolation requirements. Find out more on the export health certificate notes for guidance.

Read Previous

EEA CONFERENCE LEADS THE WAY

Read Next

Champions crowned at winter eventing series finale